RISING TO THE OCCASION

RISING TO THE OCCASION

Dallas actor Ace Anderson is on a roll.

At only 27, he’s into his third season as a member of Dallas Theater Center’s Brierley Resident Acting Company,

he’s performing in five upcoming DTC productions, he’s teaching as part of DTC’s Public Works Dallas Literacy Instruction For Texas (LIFT) initiative, he’s a spoken-word poet,

and somehow he’s finding time to run The Striped Heart, his graphic design company.

An innate can’t-stop drive has Anderson bouncing all over the creative map. “I can’t just do one thing,” he acknowledges.

 “If I start to work on another project, like writing poetry, it’ll help me with my acting because I’ve gotten to release in a different way.

It gives my brain more space to create and problem solve in the other things I’m working on.”

Anderson was determined to become an actor as early as sixth grade, and he understands the importance of teachers and mentors; he counts among his own renowned choreographer Bill T.

Jones, with whom he worked on HBO’s Masterclass series some years ago. No wonder Anderson is giving back through the Public Works Dallas LIFT program.

“What I’ve learned in working with students is that there is so much power in eradicating impossibilities,” he says.

Between his teaching and acting in Public Works Dallas productions,

he’s convinced that the arts can enhance every life, regardless of social status.

 “I’m very devoted to spreading art,” he continues.

“My job now is to spread art as vastly as I can, through whatever means I can, showing people that there are boundless possibilities in creativity.”

Anderson’s upcoming productions include DTC’s perennial A Christmas Carol, the Pulitzer Prize–winning Sweat,

Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and As You Like It, and the world premiere of Penny Candy by Dallas playwright Jonathan Norton.

“I’m really excited that in Penny Candy I’m playing a Jamaican character for the first time,” he says.

“My family is Jamaican, I’m first generation American, and I get to speak in patois, which I’ve never done on stage.

I’m hoping my grandparents can make it out to see it.”

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